Jennifer Ann Bates: Hegel and Shakespeare on the Measure for Measure: The Hangman’s Mystery -recordings

Jennifer Ann Bates HegelIn her illumination of Shakespeare through Hegel, Jennifer Ann Bates reads the logic of measure from Hegel alongside Measure for Measure. Bates argues that each text is an initiation into the execution of the logic of measure with a focus on the hangman’s mystery as discussed by Abhorson and Pompey.

Jennifer Ann Bates is Professor of Philosophy at Duquesne University, Pittsburgh. She specializes in 19th century German philosophy with an emphasis on Hegel. Professor Bates established the Philosophy Duquesne-Heidelberg Exchange in 2013 and chaired it until 2016. She has served as a Heidelberg University Alumni Research Ambassador since 2013.

Professor Bates is the author of Hegel’s Theory of Imagination (SUNY 2004), Hegel and Shakespeare on Moral Imagination (SUNY 2010), and co-editor (with Richard Wilson) of Shakespeare and Continental Philosophy (Edinburgh University Press, 2014). She has published numerous book chapters, as well as articles in the Wallace Stevens Journal, the Journal for Environmental EthicsCriticism: A Quarterly for Literature and the ArtsMemoria di ShakespearePhilosophy Compass, and Angelaki: Journal of the Theoretical Humanities. She is currently writing a chapter on Kant and Shakespeare for The Routledge Companion to Shakespeare and Philosophy, and a chapter on Kant, Hegel, Solger and Imagination for Cambridge University Press.

This talk is part of the Shakespeare and Hegel symposium (itself part of the Shakespeare at the Temple symposia), held at Garrick’s Temple to Shakespeare (Hampton, London) on April 1, 2017. The session is chaired by Richard Wilson.

Audio recorded and edited by Anna Ilona Rajala, video edited by Timo Uotinen.

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