Playreading Pericles Prince of Tyre, Oct 19 (KiRSe)

220px-Pericles_1609Shipwreck, pirates, resurrection, a goddess, incest, plague, a brothel, riddling, knights in armour and a family dispersed across the Levant: in its day immensely popular, Shakespeare’s version of one of the great European stories (adapted in conjunction with George Wilkins) inaugurates the haunting last phase of his writing career.

We’ll be reading Pericles, Prince of Tyre at 6 pm on Thursday, October 19, in the usual KiSS venue, the Gallery at the Rose in Kingston. Just come along and choose a role to read. You don’t need to know the play, you don’t need any experience. Come and sample this later addition to Shakespeare canon–as is our theme this term.

There will be a very small number of copies available at each reading but it would help immeasurably if you can bring an edition with you. The Complete Oxford Shakespeare edited by Wells and Taylor in its second edition of 2005 includes all of the plays we’re reading this term.

pericles_jg_2056

Wayne T. Carr as Pericles in the Folger Theatre production (from Washington Post / Jenny Graham).

Advertisements

About kingstonshakespeareseminar

Kingston Shakespeare is the home of KiSS, and its offshoot KiSSiT. Both explore the world by thinking through Shakespeare.
This entry was posted in KiRSE, KiSS and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Playreading Pericles Prince of Tyre, Oct 19 (KiRSe)

  1. Pingback: ‘TO LOSE NO DROP’: Retrieving the Shakespeare Canon | Kingston Shakespeare Seminar

  2. Pingback: Up-coming events, Summer and Autumn 2017 | Kingston Shakespeare Seminar

  3. Tom Deveson says:

    Sorry, I’ll have to miss this one because I have to be else where, but the others are in the diary and I have every intention of taking part.

    Best,

    Tom

    Virus-free. http://www.avg.com

    On Wed, Oct 18, 2017 at 9:22 AM, Kingston Shakespeare Seminar wrote:

    > kingstonshakespeareseminar posted: “Shipwreck, pirates, resurrection, a > goddess, incest, plague, a brothel, riddling, knights in armour and a > family dispersed across the Levant: in its day immensely popular, > Shakespeare’s version of one of the great European stories (adapted in > conjunction ” >

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s